Good news! Being and Becoming Culture-Changers

Ready for some good news in the midst of a polarized, contentious, hyper-partisan national debate?

People around the world are playing, performing and becoming other than who they are! We are embracing our human capability to be who we are and who we are not. We are being who we are becoming. There’s a conceptual revolution happening … people are creating culture change in many ways and in many places.

In August I attended the Applied Improvisation Network’s annual conference in Paris, the city of love. Barbara Tint, the President of AIN, shared this in her talk about the growth of the organization and of Applied Improvisation:

We need to hold on to the heart and the power of improvisation and what it can do in the world.

Or as my colleagues Caitlin McClure and Theresa Robbins Dudeck put it in their wonderful new book: Applied Improvisation: Leading, Collaborating, and Creating Beyond the Theatre:

Applied Improvisation is changing the way we lead, create, and collaborate. It also brings joy into this uncertain, crazy world.

At the Paris AIN conference I met people who are using Applied Improvisation in diverse settings such as the Israeli Army, sustainability/climate science, Agile teams, and work with refugees in Europe.

We are becoming humanitarians, giving people new ways to play with difficult and challenging problems.

As the co-chair of the NYC chapter of AIN, I’m proud to be the NYC liaison to the Program Committee for the 2019 AIN conference, to be held at Stony Brook University in conjunction with the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. See the announcement video here: https://youtu.be/w63vNnIFWX0

Last month the All Stars Project, Inc. and the East Side Institute – two organizations that I have helped to build for more than three decades – hosted the 10th Performing the World conference in New York. Over 400 people came together from 30 countries to address what is needed in order for people to see possibility, to imagine the inconceivable, and to take action.

We asked the question: Can humanity seize the day? And we created the answer: YES!

Workshops brought together a diverse array of creative world-changers: young magicians working/playing in the slums of Latin America, cross-border collaborations challenging current U.S. policies, humanitarian clowns from around the world, innovators in education and youth development from Taiwan, Sweden, and Nigeria, psychologists from Japan and Brazil, theatre-makers from Europe and India, and refugee workers from Greece, Italy and Serbia.

We are becoming a world of people who are challenging the status quo, the roles, institutions and ways of being that prevent us from exploring our creativity, our humanity, and our ability to be culture-changers.

We are discovering that play, performance, humor and improvisation are the tools we need to transform our world.

I’ll end with this terrific quote from one of the many thought provoking workshops at Performing the World: Performing Citizenship through Applied Improvisation led by my NYC-AIN co-chair, Don Waisanen:

2 thoughts on “Good news! Being and Becoming Culture-Changers

  1. Wonderful post. Many, many, many years ago I would have said “how is this important?” “We need to provide food, clothes, housing, money, etc. Humor, improvisation, play, development, is the gravy that people should get after they get the “essentials’.” I have learned now that improv can impact how we all exist in a world that is without essentials for so many people, and can influence the survival of those who don’t have enough.

    1. A hearty “yes, and…” humor, laughter, and play (improvisation) are essential human activities that bring us closer to others so that we have the conditions, community and support we need to create a world where everyone has food, clothing, shelter, healthcare and other “essentials” to live a decent, productive, and joyful life.

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